Theranostics 2022; 12(2):493-511. doi:10.7150/thno.64035 This issue

Review

Glucose biosensors in clinical practice: principles, limits and perspectives of currently used devices

Salvatore Andrea Pullano1, Marta Greco1, Maria Giovanna Bianco1, Daniela Foti2, Antonio Brunetti1✉, Antonino S. Fiorillo1✉

1. Department of Health Sciences, Magna Græcia University of Catanzaro, 88100, Catanzaro, Italy.
2. Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Magna Græcia University of Catanzaro, 88100, Catanzaro, Italy.

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Citation:
Pullano SA, Greco M, Bianco MG, Foti D, Brunetti A, Fiorillo AS. Glucose biosensors in clinical practice: principles, limits and perspectives of currently used devices. Theranostics 2022; 12(2):493-511. doi:10.7150/thno.64035. Available from https://www.thno.org/v12p0493.htm

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Abstract

Graphic abstract

The demand of glucose monitoring devices and even of updated guidelines for the management of diabetic patients is dramatically increasing due to the progressive rise in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and the need to prevent its complications. Even though the introduction of the first glucose sensor occurred decades ago, important advances both from the technological and clinical point of view have contributed to a substantial improvement in quality healthcare. This review aims to bring together purely technological and clinical aspects of interest in the field of glucose devices by proposing a roadmap in glucose monitoring and management of patients with diabetes. Also, it prospects other biological fluids to be examined as further options in diabetes care, and suggests, throughout the technology innovation process, future directions to improve the follow-up, treatment, and clinical outcomes of patients.

Keywords: assessment of glycemic control, glucose sensors, biological fluids, diabetes technology, point-of-care testing.